What Happened at #TRETC2018?

Each year the Three Rivers Educational Technology Conference (TRETC) shares the best in the learning realm for K-20. This year’s event occurred on November 6 at Baldwin HS, just outside the city of Pittsburgh, PA. Mike Moe, an edupreneur from Silicon Valley kicked off the event by looking at the Future of Work and the challenge for K-20 education. According to a Tweet from @Kinber:

Michael Moe @michaelmoe Co-Founder of ASU + GSV Summit @asugsvsummit this morning’s opening keynote on Reigniting the American Dream at #TRETC2018 #TRETC18 @pghtech.

Following Mike’s on point keynote, over 500 participants headed to workshops. TRETC has honored regional and state award winning educators for the past five years. This year featured presenters included: Matt Dancho talking on “Teaching in the Creative Zone;” Rachel Gatz looking at “Building Gender and Racial Equality in Tech;” Melissa Ungar using Scratch and Hummingbird Technology for 3D Storytelling; and Joe Welch, “Promoting Student Voice.”

Discover some of the presentations, including Justin Aglio’s presentation on “AI in K-12”  thanks to SIBME.

Here are some of the comments from Twitter about the sessions:

Gregg Russak exclaimed, “Really fascinating and informative presentation on Teaching and Learning in AI at TRETC 2018 .”

RJ Baxter shared, “Cyber Civility: It’s more than just Cyberbullying.”

Dr. Stanley Whiteman reported, “Great job today ⁦@MsUtley86⁩. We had a #PackedRoom at #TRETC2018 for #VR #GoogleExpeditions”

Melissa Butler related, “Shared ideas today at #TRETC2018 around engaging students in reflection about knowing/not-knowing as part of learning.”

Kevin Conner added, “@nhsdwelch sharing How I See It: Promoting Student Voice with Storytelling at TRETC 2018.”

In addition to presentations in the morning there were three workshops. Kelsey Derringer from Birdbrain Technologies worked with a packed house of over 50 adults and kids from Baldwin to create a Tiny Town using the new Micro:Bit Hummingbird. Mike Moe interacted with a team of student entrepreneurs from the Fort Cherry High School. Finally, Jody Koklades and Lisa Anselmo took people on an Edtech Smackdown.

During the lunch period TRETC participants interacted with exhibitors on the main level, People also headed downstairs to an Atrium to visit Student Showcases, discover emerging ideas in Poster Sessions, and engage in conversation with Innovative Projects and Companies.

The conference wrapped up with a reflective opportunity in the TRETC Cafe led by Dr. Jordan Lippman. Participants looked at the issue of digital equity and identified key questions that came out of the day’s activities, especially on how to prepare all students for the Future of Work.

 

 

Minds Under Construction

It’s wonderful to see a school turn itself around. For years the city of Duquesne, a formerly robust mill town outside of Pittsburgh, had a declining population with a dwindling student enrollment. This year the school experienced a 10% gain in student population. It may not be directly related, but the focus on Active Learning and two STEAM grants through the Allegheny Intermediate Unit to create Maker Spaces have brought a new mindset and energy to the school.

Ani Martinez, the Outreach Coordinator for Remake Learning, organized a field trip for interested educators to Duquesne. Ms. Samantha Utley, an Instructional Coach working in the Creation Station, and Mr. Stan Whiteman, the Assistant Principal, shared elements of the recent success story. The focus was on the Creation Station, two former industrial arts rooms that housed a CADD classroom and a Wood Shop. Today they are vibrant, active learning spaces for grades K-3 and 4-6. The former CADD room now houses light tables for students to conduct scientific investigations, a series of water pods, reading areas, a 3D printer, and work areas. The former wood shop taps into the old work tables as STEAM investigation stations and provides a host of other technological opportunities.

While the two grants provided the funding to get the project off the ground, today the Dollar Store is the major supplier of materials. Every student during the week has an opportunity to spend time in the Creation Station. However, the focus on active learning doesn’t just happen the Creation Station. According to Stan Whiteman every student now has a device, providing a 1:1 opportunity. That means active learning happens in every classroom. The Creation Station becomes the place to expand and enhance ideas.

Samantha Utley shared a fifth grade project around the African nation of Sierra Leone. While students did their research on mud slides in the classroom, they had a chance to experience Sierra Leone virtually through a Google Expedition in the Creation Station. The students gained a real opportunity in critical thinking while expanding their global awareness.

Five ways the Maker Movement can help catalyze a manufacturing renaissance

[This past week I had a chance to spend some time at the Pittsburgh TechShop for a Remake Learning meeting around Innovative Professional Development. For over 30 years I’ve preached the value of creative production. It’s exciting to see how places like Pittsburgh are becoming an ecosystem for Makers. Just this week Carnegie Mellon University received over $250 million in federal funds and other grants to establish a Robotics Center. I work with a number of projects that focus on Making, including the Makeathon developed by Birdbrain Technologies and the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, California. In this Brookings Institute report you’ll hear about many great examples how schools and cities are creating a new Industrial Revolution around Making. The article highlights a local educational example, Elizabeth Forward’s Dream Factory, a middle-school inter-disciplinary program that combines computational thinking, art, and technology. ]

Amid the hoopla of celebrating a deal to save 800 jobs at a Carrier Corp. factory in Indiana last month, President-elect Donald Trump promised to usher in a “new industrial revolution“—one that sounded as much like a social awakening as a manufacturing one.

How will the nation achieve that renaissance, though? If past is prologue, the Trump administration will lean on high-profile tweets and one-off job-retention deals combined with moves to renegotiate some trade deals to give U.S. workers a leg up.

And maybe those gestures will help.

However, there is another way to think about touching off an industrial revival in America that brings back economic growth, opportunity, and decent jobs for blue-collar workers.

That approach would embrace the Maker Movement as a deeply American source of decentralized creativity for rebuilding America’s thinning manufacturing ecosystems.

An authentic social movement of hackers and tinkerers, the Maker Movement has grown increasingly consequential in recent years as a new generation of designers and entrepreneurs has employed online tools, 3-D printing, and other new technologies to “democratize” manufacturing and reinvigorate small-batch production and sales.

A designer works on a restaurant sign at TechShop in the South of Market neighborhood in San Francisco, California April 24, 2014. In the shadow of Internet monoliths, it's easy to forget that Silicon Valley got its start from hard-scrabble tinkerers building radios, microchips and other devices. Now, a proliferation of high-tech but affordable manufacturing tools and new sources of funding are empowering a generation of handy entrepreneurs and laying the foundation for a hardware renaissance. A growing focus on hardware and the so-called "Maker movement" is sweeping northern California and, in a smaller way, Europe and other countries. Renewed interest in tinkering with objects - versus apps or software - is attracting more money from investors and fostering a growing number of workshops, where aspiring inventors can get their hands on computerized milling machines and other high-end tools. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) - RTR3NZ5D

A designer works on a restaurant sign at TechShop in the South of Market neighborhood in San Francisco, California. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

The makers’ locally-grown enterprises are expanding beyond their artisanal and hobbyist roots to create true business value. The movement has emerged as a significant source of experiential learning and skills-building, as well as creativity for the nation’s innovation-driven manufacturing sector.

More broadly, there is momentum on the ground, both in large cities and small ones, located in both red and blue America, and there is much success to share.

Two years ago, 100 mayors signed a Mayors Maker Challenge to bolster making in their communities, and now, the just-published book “Maker City: A Practical Guide to Reinventing Our Cities” reports how these strategies are working across the nation. Long to short, the story here is that the Maker Movement isn’t just about reviving manufacturing in cities (though it is doing that). In addition, the movement is proving that anyone can be a maker and that genuine progress on the nation’s most pressing problems can be made from the bottom up by do-it-yourselfers, entrepreneurs, committed artisans, students, and civic leaders through what our colleague Bruce Katz calls “new localism.” That’s both empowering and a quintessentially American story, one that de Tocqueville would immediately recognize, and that Donald Trump might even like.

And so it’s time for the nation—and especially its local business leaders, mayors, hobbyists, organizers, universities, and community colleges—to embrace the do-it-yourself spirit of the makers and start hacking the new industrial revolution one town at a time.

Ideally, the incoming Trump administration will see fit to foster this authentically American, red-blue movement with, for example, modest competitive grants to support local maker activity and expand interactions between makers and larger-scale commercial manufacturers. Federal cash, tax credits, and convening capacity could all make a huge difference to cash-strapped networks of civic entrepreneurs.

But even without such support, local leaders should take matters into their own hands and come together—city by city, community by community—to help build a new industrial resurgence that links local ingenuity to genuine economic development.

To help with that, here are five ideas for getting started:

Read more…