Copyright and Fair Use: A Personal Story

As the Coordinator of Educational Technology for the Fox Chapel Area School District I developed a series of interactive activities for all new staff members addressing copyright and fair use. It was important that every educator understood their personal issues as well as how the issues impacted her classroom instruction. I never expected I would have to deal with this issue from a personal perspective.

What happened? In 2018 I received an email and then a letter from a Canadian firm that licenses photographs. They claimed I had used a copyright image on my website without permission. They wanted me to pay for the use of the image. I was taken back and went to the webpage in question on my own website. I could not find the image. Instead, I observed that there were four images on the page for whom I owned the copyright. Then, I went to my library of graphics. Could I have downloaded the image and used it in an earlier version? No, that wasn’t the case.

I started to talk with friends and colleagues about what I should do. Most said, “Do nothing. They’ll forget about you.” Well, that didn’t happen. A week after the initial contact,  I received a letter from law firm representing the photo agency indicating that there were seeking payment for my “digression.” Then a representative from the law firm called me. This really upset me. I felt like I was being harassed for something that really was not illegal. Then a second call came. I decided it was time to get legal counsel to delve into this issue.

The attorney and I did some virtual research and the attorney found the original story I had posted. The story included the photo I had supposedly used in violation of copyright law. The photo in question was part of a story about a Japanese robot. The image appeared as “thumbnail” in the list of most recent Posts in the sidebar on my website. We believed that I had not violated copyright law and could possibly be covered by the Fair Use part of the Copyright Law.

How could I be covered? During those years when I conducted my Copyright and Fair Use workshops for the Fox Chapel Area School District I did research on the topic. I came across an article from the Stanford School of Law that outlined what I called the “PANE” factors for Fair Use. PANE stands for Purpose, Amount, Nature, and Effect. I would tell my audience, “Limit your “PANE” by following some simple guidelines. Let’s look at how this framework relates to my issue.

The Purpose for my posting was to “curate” an article in order to share with my audience of followers something that I thought would be of interest to them. I have over 900 people who follow me on Twitter. Most are educators who have similar interests about emerging technologies. In addition, I’m the co-chair of the Emerging Technologies Committee for the Consortium of Schools Network (CoSN), an organization for educational technology leaders. I write articles and do presentations on topics, such as Emerging Technologies.

The Amount deals with the percentage of the original work you use. Normally you can only use 10% of a resource to stay within the Fair Use realm. In this case, it’s moot, since there was only one image. When I worked with educators I had them think about using a part of a piece of music or a section of a paper or poem. In this case, there is a point that is relevant. The photography was part of an article. I did not just post the image. I posted an article that contained the image. Moreover, I did not post multiple copyright images. I only posted the story that contained the image in question.

The Nature is another important point. In this case it’s a bit muddy. After a second round of investigations, I discovered that I posted the story based on information from another company, TechTerra. I copied into my story information that TechTerra shared that included the copyright image.

The Effect is also very important.  My audience read the article with the incorporated photo and increased their knowledge of a unique use of robotics. The effect did not limit the market impact of the photographer or agency that owned the image.

I’d like to share this story so other educators can better understand the issues and think about how they are addressing Fair Use and Copyright. In addition, I want to stand up for my rights and use what James Comey calls “Ethical Leadership.” According to James Comey, it’s critical to use standards or outside frameworks that provide guidance to be an effective leader. I’m a strong supporter of a set of standards developed by an international technology organization called ISTE. It’s important that all educators have a framework for Digital Citizenship. I believe I’m modeling what a good Digital Citizen should do – stand up for your rights by demonstrating your knowledge of Fair Use and Copyright and don’t give in to companies seeking to make money in a questionable manner.

What Happened at #TRETC2018?

Each year the Three Rivers Educational Technology Conference (TRETC) shares the best in the learning realm for K-20. This year’s event occurred on November 6 at Baldwin HS, just outside the city of Pittsburgh, PA. Mike Moe, an edupreneur from Silicon Valley kicked off the event by looking at the Future of Work and the challenge for K-20 education. According to a Tweet from @Kinber:

Michael Moe @michaelmoe Co-Founder of ASU + GSV Summit @asugsvsummit this morning’s opening keynote on Reigniting the American Dream at #TRETC2018 #TRETC18 @pghtech.

Following Mike’s on point keynote, over 500 participants headed to workshops. TRETC has honored regional and state award winning educators for the past five years. This year featured presenters included: Matt Dancho talking on “Teaching in the Creative Zone;” Rachel Gatz looking at “Building Gender and Racial Equality in Tech;” Melissa Ungar using Scratch and Hummingbird Technology for 3D Storytelling; and Joe Welch, “Promoting Student Voice.”

Discover some of the presentations, including Justin Aglio’s presentation on “AI in K-12”  thanks to SIBME.

Here are some of the comments from Twitter about the sessions:

Gregg Russak exclaimed, “Really fascinating and informative presentation on Teaching and Learning in AI at TRETC 2018 .”

RJ Baxter shared, “Cyber Civility: It’s more than just Cyberbullying.”

Dr. Stanley Whiteman reported, “Great job today ⁦@MsUtley86⁩. We had a #PackedRoom at #TRETC2018 for #VR #GoogleExpeditions”

Melissa Butler related, “Shared ideas today at #TRETC2018 around engaging students in reflection about knowing/not-knowing as part of learning.”

Kevin Conner added, “@nhsdwelch sharing How I See It: Promoting Student Voice with Storytelling at TRETC 2018.”

In addition to presentations in the morning there were three workshops. Kelsey Derringer from Birdbrain Technologies worked with a packed house of over 50 adults and kids from Baldwin to create a Tiny Town using the new Micro:Bit Hummingbird. Mike Moe interacted with a team of student entrepreneurs from the Fort Cherry High School. Finally, Jody Koklades and Lisa Anselmo took people on an Edtech Smackdown.

During the lunch period TRETC participants interacted with exhibitors on the main level, People also headed downstairs to an Atrium to visit Student Showcases, discover emerging ideas in Poster Sessions, and engage in conversation with Innovative Projects and Companies.

The conference wrapped up with a reflective opportunity in the TRETC Cafe led by Dr. Jordan Lippman. Participants looked at the issue of digital equity and identified key questions that came out of the day’s activities, especially on how to prepare all students for the Future of Work.

 

 

STEAM Innovation

For the past four years I’ve helped to produce the South Fayette STEAM Innovation Summer Institute. This year’s two week set of workshops were extremely well received by educators and students who attended. Close to 98% of the participants gave a 4 or 5 to the workshop instructors and 99% for the organization of the sessions. Here’s a quick look at just five of the fifteen workshops that happened with quotations from the participants:

Python

Photos by Norton Gusky CC BY 4.0

Aileen Owens, the Director of Technology and Innovation for the South Fayette School District and the Coordinator for the Summer Institute, gathered together a team of South Fayette students to co-teach a four-day workshop. The students worked with Carnegie Mellon University graduate and faculty members to develop a course for 8th grade students. The summer workshop provided an opportunity not only for the students to teach, but also for other students to test out the course along with several teachers from around the Pittsburgh region. The course includes a variety of activities that incorporate the Finch robot as part of a unit based on the novel and movie, The Martian. Both students and educators enjoyed the opportunity to test out this new beta course. One the teachers commented, “I will be teaching a coding course this upcoming school year and this course exposed to me Python for the first time. It also gave an insight into what the kids would be doing in a course, how they learn the software, what intrigues them in the coding world and how they adapt to the new language they are learning.

Scratch Programming

Shad Wachter, the STEAM teacher for South Fayette’s Intermediate School, shared his talents for the fourth time this summer. Shad shared his years of experience working with Scratch for a team of educators who ranged from beginners to experienced teachers. At South Fayette everything fits into a computational framework. Shad constantly provided stories from his classes on how sets Scratch and the classroom experiences part of a larger context that includes the ability to problem-solve, develop algorithms, find repeating patterns, and use coding as part of other tools, such as BlocksCAD, a free kids-focused graphics program. According to one of the educators, “Everything was new! If I begin working at an intermediate or middle school, I can absolutely see fitting Scratch into the curriculum to introduce computational thinking!

Join the Maker Movement

Melissa Unger, the South Fayette Elementary STEAM teacher, has become one of the premier educators in the Pittsburgh region taking the Making tradition into the primary curriculum. She sets the stage at South Fayette for students’ foray into computational thinking. In her workshop she shared a variety of activities that she employs with her K-2 students. To get students to start to work in collaborative teams she uses BreakoutEDU, an immersive learning environment where students (or teachers) need to find clues to open a series of locked boxes that have clues toward a final goal. Educators who had never worked together quickly became a team working together to figure out the clues to open a series of locks. In another activity Melissa challenges her students (teachers) to use an electric toothbrush and stickers to create a machine to generate mathematical drawings. The challenge is really an introduction to the design and engineering process, a key component of South Fayette’s curriculum. Teachers come to South Fayette to learn from workshop facilitators who have become leaders in the region. One of the teachers remarked, “We are starting a maker space extreme in the fall and this workshop gave me many, many ideas from equipment to storage. Instructor was remarkable.”

Building Sustainable Mindsets

For the first time South Fayette partnered with Chatham University’s Eden Hall Campus. According to the Summer Institute program: Topics in sustainability have great potential to help integrate across the disciplines while providing fodder for meaningful, student-driven projects in schools and communities. This workshop will introduce participants to mindsets and topics in sustainability, including: food systems and access, biodiversity, green buildings and schools, air quality, renewable energy, aquaponics, vertical gardening, community development, systems thinking and ecoliteracy. For the session participants used a Project Based Learning (PBL) framework to begin planning units to encourage students to take action in their schools and communities. The participants were quite enthused by their experiences in Sustainability and PBL. One of the educators indicated how well the two themes wove into her work, “My job is mostly project based so this helped me think about sustainability for my program.

STEAM Innovation

Another key component for South Fayette program is infusing the arts into the STEM framework. Stephanie Deluca, South Fayette’s Curriculum, Technology, and Innovation Coordinator (K-12), shared her experiences with the Summer Institute participants. One of the favorite projects tapped into the power of the Hummingbird, a Robotics kit developed at Carnegie Mellon University, and used as part of intermediate and middle school projects at South Fayette. Educators had to design their own interactive representation for a language arts unit. For another activity participants had to create their own visualizations for cells using water colors. How did the educators react? “It was great getting to know different fun things to do in a STEAM classroom.” “There were interesting ways to implement coding and robotics into the LA curriculum, science, social studies and STEAM. Creating a scene from a book, or play, demonstrating how body parts move and work.”